Fabric For Freedom for Fashion Revolution. "Who Made My Clothes?"

With the Fashion Revolution Week just ending we have once again opened our eyes to the world of fashion and its social and environmental impact. Never before has the Fashion Revolution movement been as vital for our planet and for garment workers. We at Fabric For Freedom - with our sustainable and ethical values have been active during this week to ask for a more sustainable, transparent and fair fashion.

 

FABRIC FOR FREEDOM MAGAZINE SUSTAINABLE AND ETHICAL WOMENS FASHION FOR A FASHION REVOLUTION

 
There are many clothes we wear every day for different activities and occasions, or clothes keep for sentimental reasons that we do not wear as often. Each of piece of clothing has a life story in which we, like their consumers are characters; their life starts before the act of buying, somewhere else in the world involved in the lives and work of other people. Clothes like other things made by human hands they; 

"are commodities and they all contain stories encompassing geography and time, supply and demand, raw materials and market forces, and people. People with names and toes and sores and wages and fancies and parents and memories." (Cohen, 1997).

 

FABRIC FOR FREEDOM MAGAZINE SUSTAINABLE AND ETHICAL WOMENS FASHION FOR A FASHION REVOLUTION FABRIC FOR FREEDOM MAGAZINE SUSTAINABLE AND ETHICAL WOMENS FASHION FOR A FASHION REVOLUTION

 

Following this concept the Fashion Revolution movement invites people to ask themselves, to stop to reflect on who is behind the clothes they buy, they wear and often they waste."Who Made My Clothes?" is the question-symbol of the Fashion Revolution, a step towards an impact to change the perspective of fashion. This question pushes, encourages people to consider the human beings and the processes involved in the production of the clothes currently on the market.

 

 

FABRIC FOR FREEDOM MAGAZINE SUSTAINABLE AND ETHICAL WOMENS FASHION FOR A FASHION REVOLUTION

 

 

People focus on style, price and the fit of clothes ignoring how garments are made, but the simple truth behind clothes is that we wear commodities made by human hands. Asking brands "Who Made My Clothes?" is a way to ask for transparency, asking to see the manufacturing, the supply chain and the working conditions. Transparency and human rights are the core values of Fabric For Freedom and of Esther Knight, our founder; the brand aims for a fairer and sustainable fashion future.

Everything started with a social commitment campaigning against Human Trafficking, supporting charity organisations and in helping communities to overcome poverty.

 

As a buyer, Esther dealt with the human cost of fashion which led her to create Fabric For Freedom: a brand without human and environmental costs. We offer a sustainable alternative to fast fashion with long-life garments made responsibly, honestly, and with modern taste. Fabric For Freedom uses organic and recycled materials; garments are ethically produced in the UK assuring fair wages and proper working conditions to avoid another Rana Plaza factory incident.

On 24 April 2013, 1,138 people lost their lives in the collapse of Rana Plaza factory in Bangladesh. This incident marked the birth of the Fashion Revolution movement and has exposed the reality behind fast fashion brands. Fabric For Freedom shares Fashion Revolution values:

"we believe in the fashion industry that values people and their work, that protect the environment, creativity, and profits in equal measure".

 

FABRIC FOR FREEDOM MAGAZINE SUSTAINABLE AND ETHICAL WOMENS FASHION FOR A FASHION REVOLUTION

 

 

FABRIC FOR FREEDOM MAGAZINE SUSTAINABLE AND ETHICAL WOMENS FASHION FOR A FASHION REVOLUTION

 

With this article we welcome you to the Fabric For Freedom Magazine, a catalyst for contents on fashion sustainability, social and political commitments, and to give a clear view on ethical cues to build a better fashion world.

 

 

 

 

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